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24 September 2012

Guest Blogger: EDELINE LEE


Those of you who know me will know that I tend towards the low tech. Facebook just passed over my head and I haven’t figured out how to use Twitter yet.  This is of course the first time I’ve ever written for a blog – so I hope you will be patient with me!

Autumn Winter 2012 was my first selling collection and I was very lucky to gain Browns’ support. Many of you will not yet know my work so I would like to take this opportunity to introduce it to you.


For this collection, I was inspired by the work of El Lissitzky and the architectural drawings of Bart Van der Leck and Theo Van Doesberg.   

I tried to juxtapose the textures and colors of my fabrics and compose my lines according to these principles and aesthetics. My Autumn Winter fabrics included a fine washed silk cotton organdie, a heavy cotton moleskin, an unbelievably soft cashmere wool, a traditionally crafted tweed using graphic black and white, and a futuristic tech “fur”.  All of my fabrics are made in France and Italy.

On the De Unie net dress, a tiny line of red silk piping is panelled with black silk-edged tweed. I like the contrast of an “honest”, traditional fabric next to something completely contemporary and high tech.   

I don’t think there is anything more luxurious in fashion than immaculate craftsmanship and beautifully, hand-finished details. Here, each button loop has been wrapped by hand in red silk thread.

These tiny mother-of-pearl buttons were individually painted with black dots by hand in our studio.

Here are the buttons on the De Vonk Silk Antung Shirt.

A hand-embroidered red silk cross stitch holds a vent together on silk cotton organdie.

This is a close up of the Lissitzky moleskin coat.The welt pockets are lined with cashmere and it has heavy, solid brass buttons and hand-pulled loop fastenings. All of the above pieces are available at Browns now.

Thank you for reading my first blog.  
x. Edeline 


Photography: Eisaku Minakata

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